How to survive on a motorcycle

Advice and Tips to keep it rubber side DOWN!

How to survive on a motorcycle

Postby squirrelman » Fri Sep 27, 2013 3:38 pm

Use caution always, and read this......

www.piratesk12site.net/SAFETY1.htm
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Re: How to survive on a motorcycle

Postby John Hilmer » Fri Sep 27, 2013 4:48 pm

Squirrelman,

Thanks for the link and more so for the concern as these smaller bikes attract newer riders.

The information provided is very good and I hope that everyone will take the time to read through it ALL.

That said, I've read through many similar tutorials and most are very good but lengthy. This discourages the reader from going through them all the way, to say nothing about the reader taking exception to how the particular presentation elects to present and prioritize the information. I've never read through any of these and thought that the organization of the material was well done. I still suggest that this is well worth reading even if the reader takes exception to the presentation. At the very least the reader is thinking about all of this, right?

Those of us with a lot of experience, see in these tutorials, wisdom and fact. Those with little experience may well not comprehend or understand the information correctly because the presented information assumes a level of understanding that the new rider may not comprehend correctly.

Clearly, I'm considering the newer riders first and not the veterans here with my concerns. The vets already know most of what is presented but will benefit from considering these things again.

My perspective is that for the newer riders the first and foremost thing to do is take the course.

Second is to learn and practice counter steering. This gives the rider directional control. If you don't understand this Google it. This allows the rider to make abrupt directional changes when needed. I practice this abrupt change on the road and in a clean parking lot often. The object is to learn how much of this you and the bike are capable of. Push this until you encounter tire slips if you have the courage. then you'll know what your limits are. This practice has saved my life twice that I can recall.

Third is to practice panic stops in a clean parking lot or on an empty road. I've had occasion to get radical on the brakes to avoid cars turning left in front of me or pulling out into my lane from a side street many times and so will you. The most violent was not many months ago. I was riding at 25 MPH crossing a "TEE" intersection to my right. I focused on the wheels of the car that was about to collect me not more than 70 feet from my line of travel. Because I had practiced, I managed to avoid a collision when the car pulled into my path and stopped there. I had control to a point as I did stop the bike short of the car by about 3 feet, but my feet were thrown forward of the pegs by the time I stopped and I almost did an Arty Johnson tricycle dump. Speed and braking capability are things that you have to know about, and if you do not practice these things you'll be sorry.

Fourth would be; Yeah, all of the other things that I'm not going to address here. They are endless when you consider the total of what can happen when we ride.

OK, fourth is make sure you are riding on a well performing machine with properly inflated tires.

I give up,

John
Lord help me to be the man my Labrador thought I was.
It's never too late to have a happy childhood ...
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Re: How to survive on a motorcycle

Postby NEMissourian » Mon Oct 27, 2014 6:26 pm

I almost hit the back of a car one night. It's brake lights were not working. Had the brakes locked on my GPZ and had to put my foot down to keep from falling. Never had that happen with a tree.
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Re: How to survive on a motorcycle

Postby squirrelman » Fri Oct 31, 2014 11:52 pm

Hey fellas, if you have any tips to add to the list, contact the editor as he accepted one of my suggestions and added it to the list. ;)
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Re: How to survive on a motorcycle

Postby VTRamen » Sat Nov 01, 2014 12:59 pm

Went to work early one morning this week. With the shorter days, it is still dark in the morning when I leave home. Anyway, it was foggy out there, that combined with rain and dark made for less than ideal conditions. I made it to work ok, but wasn't entirely comfortable out there. Probably should have used the car, but kept my speed down and lots of distance from other vehicles on the highway. Watched out for standing water, etc.
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Re: How to survive on a motorcycle

Postby NEMissourian » Sat Nov 01, 2014 6:20 pm

When I lived in Chicago in the 7os I had several incidents that just couldn't be rare. Once while on an interstate it began to start raining. A most dangerous time for motorbikes. I got to my exit, a long downhill ramp that dumped out on a busy a busy cross road. I could see buses and trucks crossing. As I got onto my brakes I got massive skids. I was pumping them staying straight but not decelerating nearly fast enough to prevent getting into the roadway. I had a flash of brilliance, jump onto the little triangular island and perhaps the island wouldn't have so much oil on the wet pavement. Yeah for me it worked. I bunny hopped the curb and stopped.

Incident two was more preventable. I went to school about 20 miles from my home. The weather was cool but clear, I had a day of tests. Rode to school. About noon I went out and noticed that there was decent lake effect snow coming down. By the time I left there was a blanket of snow. I thought this is going to be interesting. I got on the interstate and noticed that I couldn't run with traffic as I didn't have the traction. I got back off and proceeded to ride home a 15 mph with both feet on the ground. Took something like 2 1/2 hours.

Incident 3 involved riding up south Michigan Ave to take a roll of Kodachrome film to their photolab. They would process it for you and have it ready inside an hour. There were a couple of S turns on the road. The first one felt a little slick and the second one just washed out the front wheel. After crashing I turn around to hear another bike going down right behind me. Turns out that there was literally gallons of diesel fuel on the road surface.

Incident 4 I was in the left lane of a multilane road way. To my left was a steel guard rail. I was going probably 65-70. Suddenly the ignition went dead. I pulled in the clutch as traffic was starting to come around me. In an instant I thought I saw a hole in traffic and banked my bike hard to the right across 4 lanes probably onto the shoulder. Avoiding disaster. Amazing when the fuze blows.

Be careful
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Re: How to survive on a motorcycle

Postby jackfrank » Tue Jul 02, 2019 5:40 am

Thanks for sharing a beautiful link. I visit the link and see the photos and read it properly and learn something more what I expect. My body is shaking when I visited the site reading about it and see the images — safety at first.
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