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Re: Starting over

PostPosted: Wed Dec 19, 2018 7:36 pm
by Barbie & Skipper
Removing, cleaning, rebuilding, and reinstalling a set of carbs is a good indication that you are going to need to sync them. It's part of the process.

If you're referring to a static sync prior to installation, that is not going to be materially affected by removing the carb connecting bolt during installation.
LOOSENING the carb connecting bolt during installation is a bad idea. It will allow huge stresses on the mounting boss, and may break it off. The bolt should be removed entirely.

Even with a manual static sync, it is appropriate to do a vacuum sync on the carbs after installation.

If unbolting the carbs seems like a bad idea to you, and you have no trouble removing or reinstalling them while they are still bolted, my information will not be of much use. I'm just passing on what I've learned, not trying to force anyone to do things a certain way.

Re: Starting over

PostPosted: Wed Dec 19, 2018 9:32 pm
by squirrelman
yes, i was suggesting that the bench synch would be different after the crossbolt was loosened then re-tightened.

oct 15---18 018.JPG


12-1-17 175.JPG

Re: Starting over

PostPosted: Mon Jan 21, 2019 11:36 pm
by Barbie & Skipper
Skipper has been running well, but has a few issues. She's been leaking fork oil pretty badly, fouling the brake pads & rotor. The petcock is not feeding fuel on reserve, and she stranded me again. Fortunately I was only about 1/2 mile from a gas station.

I ordered fork seals for both bikes, and they are supposed to arrive tomorrow. I pulled Skipper apart today, and things went well until trying to remove the socket bolt at the bottom of the fork. I couldn't get the socket bolt out of either fork, and finally decided to pull the parts off the parts bike. It seemed like a good idea at the time, so I completely stripped the parts bike while I was at it. It was somewhat of a surprise just how easy the bike was to strip down to a bare frame.

The parts bike only has 20k on it, and the forks came apart easily. They were filled with a nasty sludge that could hardly be called fork oil, but the socket bolts popped out with no issues. A friend of mine came over and helped for a while. We're going to wind up drilling out the socket bolts on Skipper's original forks. Hopefully Skipper will get buttoned up tomorrow.

I put the chinese ebay petcock on Barbie because she was leaking. I'll be putting Barbie's original petcock on Skipper. Apparently I'd just over-tightened it a bit and cut the o-ring.

Skipper's tach has been acting funny. Sometimes the tach won't respond until I take her out on the freeway. After a few miles at speed, the tach recovers and works for a few more days. She had the same issue when I first put her back together, which was fixed by using contact cleaner on the connections. Since everything is apart, I'll clean the connections again, and use dielectric grease this time.

Re: Starting over

PostPosted: Wed Jan 23, 2019 9:09 pm
by Barbie & Skipper
Mostly good news. I buttoned Skipper back up today. I had purchase some Progressive Suspension fork springs for Barbie years ago, but had never installed them. It seemed apropos to put them in Skipper's forks. I hadn't read the FSM closely until putting the forks back together, and discovered that I should have replaced the slider and guide bushings. Both were showing more that 75% copper, but I just reinstalled them anyway.

The socket bolts drilled out cleanly, with no damage to the forks. The parts bike's forks looked better externally, but the tube with sludge in it was a bit rough/rusty inside. I'll get it cleaned up later, but for now put Skipper's forks back on. The PS springs are 1" longer than stock, so I cut the included PVC pipe to 3" to replace the stock 4" spacers. 15W BelRay fork oil to the PS recommended 140mm height, and it went back together without a hitch.

After cleaning the rotor and pads from the dripping fork oil, I decided to go ahead and install the EBC brake pads that were received previously. Also adjusted the rear shock preload to 4, from the previous setting of 2.

The suspension is much improved. Of course, it couldn't help but be, since it had leaked out most of the oil out of both forks previously, but the bike feels much more taut and responsive. After a ~20-mile trip, the pads are bedding in nicely. Considering she had old, oil-soaked pads previously, the braking wasn't bad, but now the bike has real brakes.

The bad news was the petcock swap. My repair efforts on Barbie's old petcock were unsuccessful. I smelled a whiff of fuel at stops, and sure enough, it was leaking when I came home. The tank is now drained, and another petcock is on the way. ETA is 01-26/02-04, so Skipper should be on the road again quite soon.

Re: Starting over

PostPosted: Wed Jan 23, 2019 9:39 pm
by ExTex77
Sounds like a lot of progress. ANd a lot of work.

Enjoy!

Re: Starting over

PostPosted: Wed Jan 30, 2019 5:09 pm
by Barbie & Skipper
Skipper now has her new petcock installed, and it seems to be working properly. I shortened the fuel pickup tube, but haven't run her to reserve yet to see where the crossover point is.

Both bikes are mostly functional and road worthy at this point, but there are still a few things that will need addressed at some point in the future:

I have jet kits for both bikes. Skipper has some track-day-conditions fuel starvation issues, and I'm planning on doing a K&N air filter conversion, so the plan is to re-check the float levels, change the filter, and swap the jets in one fell swoop.
Barbie's fork seals are still weeping slightly, so I'll probably do her jets when I get around to the fork seals.

Skipper's rear turn signals are functional, but a bit rough cosmetically. It would be nice to upgrade both bikes' front turn signals to include running lights.

I'd like to add some power outlets (12v & USB) to both bikes. Both currently have battery tender pigtails.

Because of the variety of fueling issues, along with limited riding, it's hard to tell where mpg's are going to wind up. So far, it looks like about 50-55 mpg, but I expect that to go up slightly.

After so many years of having kick-stand kill switches, it's a bit embarrassing to find myself riding off occasionally with the sidestand still extended. :oops:

As neither bike has done over 100 miles in a day since the rebuilds, it remains to be seen how the somewhat cramped riding position will work out. I find my knee on the footpeg from time to time when doing a tight turn from a dead stop, which always makes me smile under the helmet. I'm only 5-9 or so, but these bikes were made for people even smaller than me. Even at that, they've been pretty comfortable on the short hops that I've been making.

Both the BT45's (110/90-16 & 120/90-17) on Barbie and the Conti Road Attack 3's (110/70-17 & 140/70-17) on Skipper have been great in the first few hundred miles. If anything, I was expecting a noticeable difference between the bias-plies and the radials. It could be just me, but both seem fine.

Since the replacement of the fork seals, fork springs, and front brake pads, Skipper's handling and braking are much improved. Both bikes now stop and handle great.

It's been a lot of fun getting both of these old girls back on the road. It's been good for them and for me. After the crash, my confidence and my body had both taken a beating. These bikes have helped rebuild my riding confidence dramatically.

Re: Starting over

PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2019 12:26 am
by Murdo1
Nice work. Enjoy the ride.

Re: Starting over

PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2019 2:43 am
by Janovich
Do you have documentation how you replaced the front brake pads?
I'm noticing mine have been a bit squeeky and don't brake as well as I'd prefer.

A quick glance at the system left me wondering how someone should get them out and put new ones back in without too much hassle.

Re: Starting over

PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2019 10:37 am
by Barbie & Skipper
Janovich wrote:Do you have documentation how you replaced the front brake pads?
I'm noticing mine have been a bit squeeky and don't brake as well as I'd prefer.

A quick glance at the system left me wondering how someone should get them out and put new ones back in without too much hassle.


I replaced the pads on my '90,not on my '89. In the FSM (viewtopic.php?f=6&t=50#p162), on pages 15-4 & 15-5, the process looks pretty straightforward.
Remove the brake disc cover.
Push the pistons all the way in to allow installation of new brake pads.
Remove the pad pin.

Replace the brake pads with new ones.

Install the pad pin through the holes in the new pads.
Tighten the pad pin. (18Nm/13ft-lb)
Install the disc cover and tighten the bolts. (18Nm/13ft-lb)

Re: Starting over

PostPosted: Thu Jan 31, 2019 6:40 pm
by squirrelman
Janovich wrote:Do you have documentation how you replaced the front brake pads?
I'm noticing mine have been a bit squeeky and don't brake as well as I'd prefer.

A quick glance at the system left me wondering how someone should get them out and put new ones back in without too much hassle.


there is a clever indicator on the caliper where an arrow shows how much wear is on the pads. ;)